An Introduction to Latin Dance

latin dance

Introduction to the Latin social dances

If you want to become a well balanced Salsero or Salsera, it is important to have an understanding of all of Latin dance and music. Let’s explore some of today’s great dances and examine why they are beneficial to your salsa skills, moves and techniques. This article focuses on social dances in the Latin style. This differs from Latin dance hall dance consisting of five specific styles: rumba, samba, double step, cha-cha-cha and jive.

Meringue

Merengue is a dance from the Dominican Republic, often cited as the National Dance of D. D. Like many musical styles in D. R., merengue was “country music”. The music is attributed to a Nico Lora, who created it in the 1920s and bears the name of the meringue dessert of egg whites and sugar. The first years of merengue began in brothels and bars of the valleys region around Santiago, formally called the Cibao. With their humble beginnings, but harmful, efforts to ban meringue in high society have proven effective even in the 1930s under the domination of Rafael Trufillo 1930-1961, the dance imposed on all levels the company with enough Silencing other forms of national music such as bachata. Trujillo embraced this language while speaking with his humble origin, the very one of a rural area. Many songs during his dictatorship were composed to praise his virtues and contributions to the nation.

Why is it important for a salsa dancer? It is a free circulation. Many people sit for the meringue. It can be said of bachata or cha-cha. Dancing merengue helps you improve the position of the locks and hands. In all areas of training, if you can do something slowly and perfectly, it will take some time before you can do it quickly. Enter fully into full gear will incorporate techniques and bad habits in your dance.

Bachata

Bachata is another dance of the Dominican Republic, with the themes of desperate emotion, romance, and anguish. Bachata is the equivalent of Blues in the United States, many of the same subjects are discussed and have similar resolutions as to find in the bottom of the bottle. One can easily recognize bachata by its predominant use of electric guitar that breaks the main rhythm, usually a rating of eight races. An evolution of Bolero, Bachata has had great success in clubs in recent years.

Bachata is a more intimate dance but it will help you learn the body language of Latin dance. You will feel the natural movement of the other and the amount of lead and follow. To become a better dancer, you have to become versatile. It is not enough to know how to make a lot of moves, or how to show. You should establish a connection with your partner so it feels like a dance, not a test of ability. So take the essence of bachata, sensuality and connection, and put them into practice in your dance.

Cha Cha

Cha Cha, originally called Cha-Cha-Cha, is a derivative of the Cuban music / dance mambo. This musical style can be attributed directly to the composer Enrique Jorrín for the creation of danzones that focus on his syncopa cha-cha. Jorrin has called himself the songs “creatively modified danzones” with the onomatopoeic shield of Cha-Cha-Cha of his dancers feet made during this step.

Cha cha can be a boring dance for many people not versed in it, but I’ve seen firsthand what the great salseros can do with this dance. While many salsa movements work with it, and there are many specific Cha Cha movements, cha cha a social goal is perfection of technique. With the addition of chachachá synchronization you can easily add multiple towers, many glitters, luxury hand style footwork, and the hip movement of Cuba during the basic step. Help then use Cha Cha as a time to practice your skills, but also your musicality. As you practice more, you can deviate from the restriction to the base for a complete song. Play with rhythm and polyrhythmia accent while dancing. So put some cha cha on the iPod and ask the DJ to play in the club and have fun. Getting lost in music can be a good thing if you do it right.

samba

Samba salsa is like a sister but with many different faces; The exhibitionist party go to the royal heir to the ballroom. It is lively and rhythmic and full of passion and is immersed in history. While having a share in the world of ballroom dancing, Samba is very different in his homeland, Brazil. Throughout the tumultuous political history of Brazil, the samba was a unifying factor and union, that gathers the individuals independently of social or ethnic group.

The roots of the samba come, as with much music in the New World with the arrival of the slaves in South America. The rhythmic knowledge of Angola has been mixed with the harmonious and melodic Portuguese and Iberian instrumentation. Although many similarities of the slave trade between North and South America, very different musical styles, largely thanks to the masters of Brazilian slaves to the inheritance of their slaves African procedure. In North America, this has been largely stifled by the fear of communication among slaves.

Samba is ideal for working on the individualization of your style. And the Carnival (Carnival), which Samba Sin Pe is best known for, it’s all about style and being eye-catching. Most movements emphasize the characteristics of masculinity and femininity. There is no physical connection but the emotional connection. Samba Sin Pe often can be an additional distance in which the male usually dances around the woman while she accentuates hips and seductive shoulders. This is the fundamental theme of the persecution inherent in many dances and other forms of art. Samba gafieira is a more intimate connection and the hunt is largely replaced by the first and the next. Natural rhythmic differences between samba and salsa also give rise to different style options with hips and feet.

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